Fachgebiet Wirtschafts- und Infrastrukturpolitik (WIP)

InfraTrain Autumn School

INFRATRAIN is a series of events in INFRAstructure research and policy TRAINingdesigned for graduate scholars, practitioners, and policy makers. They are designed to promote the training of graduate scholars (advanced Master students, PhD-students, post-docs) as well as junior practitioners and policy makers (from ministries, regulatory agencies, and the private sector).

INFRATRAIN is designed as a forum for exchanging ideas of established research and work in progress, whereas the mutual development of new ideas by on-site communication is also seen as a major objective. Thereby INFRATRAIN covers the theoretical and applied topics most relevant for modern European infrastructure policy.

Participants are offered alternative training sessions with a small number of participants. Beside that, attendees can present their own research work in seminars. Keynote lectures of high level researchers complete the program.

InfraTrain is coordinated by the Workgroup for Economic and Infrastructure Policy (WIP) at TU Berlin, and the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin). Scientific coordinators of INFRATRAIN are Prof. Dr. Christian von Hirschhausen (TU Berlin/DIW Berlin), Jens Weibezahn (TU Berlin), and Nicole Wägner (DIW Berlin)

Overview of past schools

Autumn School 2022

The INFRATRAIN 2022 took place from October 10–14, 2022, physically in Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Modeling Sustainable Energy Markets: Hydrogen, Gases Electricity, and Energy Systems.

Sessions

1) (Global) Gas and Hydrogen market modeling

The course provides an introduction to an “old” energy carrier that plays a role in the decarbonization of energy systems: Hydrogen. Currently, demand for hydrogen is modest (~ 100 mn. tons per year) and is mainly supplied by steam methane reformation. But demand is expected to grow, and can also be met, amongst others, by renewable energies using electrolysis, and biomass using gasification. After introductory exercises, a multi-period hydrogen model is developed that includes generation, trading, transportation, and final demand. The model, programmed in GAMS, is developed on the basis of the “twin” Global Gas Model (GGM) that has been used in previous Infratrain sessions. The course also includes a discussion of regional and global hydrogen markets, applications in certain sectors, and the role of political and socio-economic constraints. Participants should have some background in energy market research and some experience in numerical modeling; an introduction to mixed-complementarity modeling and GAMS will be provided.

Trainers: Prof. Franziska Holz DIW Berlin, and NTNU Trondheim, and Jefferson Riera, Berlin University of Technology

Junior trainers: Lukas Barner and Lennart Rathje, Research Assistants,Berlin University of Technology.

2) Modeling integrated macro-energy systems

This course provides an introduction to modeling macro-energy systems with a focus on renewables and sector integration, i.e., the integration of the electricity, transportation, and heating sector.

As an introduction, the course briefly covers the technical basics and societal background of energy system models. In the following, we focus on linear optimization models for techno-economic planning of macro-energy systems using the AnyMOD.jl Julia framework. Applications of the framework can address investment and operation of infrastructure for conversion, storage, and transport of energy over a pathway of multiple years. A specific focus is on enabling high shares of fluctuating renewables and accordingly, intermediate content includes stochastic optimization to cover multiple climatic years.

In the course, participants can build on several existing models for Europe and North America or pursue novel applications of their own. Applicants should have a background in energy system analysis and some experience in numerical modelling. The necessary Julia skills will be conveyed within the course.

Trainers: Dr. Leonard Goeke, Mario Kendziorski (Berlin University of Technology and DIW Berlin)

Junior trainers: Enno Wiebrow (Berlin University of Technology)

Autumn School 2021

The INFRATRAIN 2021 took place from October 11–15, 2021, digitally (out of Berlin). It is dedicated to the issue of Modeling Sustainable Energy and Transport Markets: Mobility, Hydrogen, Electricity, and Energy Systems.

 

Sessions

1) (Global) Hydrogen market modeling
The course provides an introduction to an “old” energy carrier that plays a role in the decarbonization of energy systems:
Hydrogen. Currently, demand for hydrogen is modest (~ 100 mn. tons per year) and is mainly supplied by steam methane
reformation. But demand is expected to grow, and can also be met, amongst others, by renewable energies using
electrolysis, and biomass using gasification. After introductory exercises, a multi-period hydrogen model is developed that
includes generation, trading, transportation, and final demand. The model, programmed in GAMS, is developed on the
basis of the “twin” Global Gas Model (GGM) that has been used in previous Infratrain sessions. The course also includes
a discussion of regional and global hydrogen markets, applications in certain sectors, and the role of political and socioeconomic constraints. Participants should have some background in energy market research and some experience in
numerical modeling; an introduction to mixed-complementarity modeling and GAMS will be provided.


Trainers: Prof. Franziska Holz DIW Berlin, and NTNU Trondheim, and Jefferson Riera, Berlin University of Technology
Junior trainers: Lukas Barner and Lennart Rathje, Research Assistants, Berlin University of Technology.


2) Risk in Stochastic Electricity Markets
This course will overview current day-ahead and real-time electricity market practices and gradually build novel constructs
to treat uncertainty and risk imposed by the stochasticity of renewable generation resources and contingencies. In particular,
these constructs will include means and metrics to quantify risk of constraint violations, aggregated system risk exposure
and how such risks can be mitigated by means of machine learning and risk trading. The course will be accompanied by
computational exercises (implemented in Julia) that will reinforce the current practice and emerging market concepts
described above.


Trainer: Prof. Yury Dvorkin, PhD, Assistant Professor at the Tandon School of Engineering at New York University.
Junior trainers: Dr. Robert Mieth (NYU), Richard Weinhold, Berlin University of Technology, and Dr. Jens Weibezahn,
Copenhagen School of Energy Infrastructure (CSEI).


3) Energy system modeling with sector coupling
This course provides an introduction to energy system modeling with a focus on renewables and sector integration, i.e., the
integration of the electricity, transportation, and heating sector. After some introductory exercises, the course applies the
AnyMOD.jl Julia framework to model complex macro-energy systems, based on techno-economic optimization. Applications
will address investment and operation of infrastructure for conversion, storage, and transport of energy over multiple years.
A specific focus is on enabling high shares of fluctuating renewables in such models. In the course, participants can build
on existing models for Europe and North America or pursue novel applications of their own. Applicants should have a
background in energy system analysis and some experience in numerical modelling. The necessary Julia skills will be
conveyed within the course.


Trainers: Prof. Christian von Hirschhausen and Leonard Goeke, Berlin University of Technology and DIW Berlin
Junior trainers: Mario Kendziorski and Elmar Zozmann, Berlin University of Technology


4) Modeling sustainable transport and mobility for a decarbonized energy system
This course will give an introduction into challenges and relevance of the decarbonization of the transport sector. Following
a brief overview on the role of transportation in the overall energy system as well as the traditional goals of transport planning
and modeling, the course focuses on aggregated transport modeling. The model simulates transport decisions while taking
into account measurable performance attributes of the transport system like travel time, prices and accessibility. Simulation
of mobility behavior allows modelers to shed light into transport demand patterns and levers to influence these through
policies, infrastructure measures, and lifestyle changes. Demand-side measures are deemed important for the
decarbonization of transport within the limited period that remains and need intensified attention in the near future.
Participants should have some background and interest in transportation analysis as well as some experience with Python.


Trainers: Several experienced lecturers and practitioners in transport and mobility
Junior trainers: Marlin Arnz, Rainer-Lemoine Institute, and Karlo Hainsch, Berlin University of Technology
 

Autumn School 2020

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic the INFRATRAIN in 2020 was cancelled.

Autumn School 2019

The INFRATRAIN 2019 took place from October 7 to 11, 2019, at TU Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Sustainable Infrastructure Modeling: Numerical Models and Data Analysis.

Training Sessions

1) Modeling Resource Markets: Advanced Methods of Operations Research

This course investigates strategic interactions in energy resource markets and covers advanced optimization and equilibrium concepts to solve the associated models. It aims to provide participants with a strong theoretical understanding of Generalized Nash games, leader-follower Stackelberg games, and the related mathematical concepts of (Quasi-) Variational Inequalites (VI and QVI), Mixed Complementarity Problems, and Mathematical/Equilibrium Problems under Equilibrium Constraints (MPEC/EPEC). The practical part of the course covers applications of these methodologies to energy market problems, based on examples from the recent literature, and case studies in the oil, natural gas, and coal sector. Participants are expected to have a basic knowledge of nonlinear optimization, mixed complementarity problems, Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions and convexity in higher dimensions as well as hands-on experience in GAMS.

Trainer: Prof. Sauleh Siddiqui, PhD, Assistant Professor at the Whiting School of Engineering Co-Director of the Center for Systems Science & Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore.

Junior trainers: Dawud Ansari, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) and Energy Access and Development Program (EADP) and Chris Hauenstein, Berlin University of Technology and CoalExit research group.

2) Water Economics

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of water economics and water-pricing, including environmental, social, and regulatory issues. The course provides an introduction into the technical and economic analysis of water (availability, flows, stocks, etc.) and then includes theories on Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM), water tariffs and social welfare under scarcity, and transboundary water resource management. The course’s practical part covers applications of the presented methodologies. Participants will prepare case studies on water related issues from recent literature, amongst them ecological sanitation, downstream externalities, water quality trading, etc.

Trainers: Prof. Dr. Georg Meran (lead instructor),Professor and Markus Siehlow, Senior Researcher at the Workgroup for Environmental Economics and Policy at the Berlin University of Technology.

Junior trainers: Maximilian Reinhardt and Gero Scheck, Research Assistants,Berlin University of Technology.

3) Applied Econometrics in Environmental and Sustainability Economics

This course provides a broad introduction to microeconometric empirical methods for economists, focusing on applications in environmental economics and related fields. The target audience are advanced masters and early doctoral students. Completing the course will contribute to providing the basis so that students can conduct independent empirical research at the advanced masters/doctoral level. We expect that students have completed a graduate-level introduction to econometrics and statistics. Basic knowledge of microeconomic theory will also be expected. A more specialized background in microeconometrics will be an advantage. The course consists of four intensive days of classes, with four 90-minute sessions per day. Sessions will consist of theoretical work and applications.

Trainers: Dr. Aleksandar Zaklan (lead instructor), Nicole Wägner, Alejandro Sarmiento, Dr. Astrid Cullmann, et al., Senior Researchers at the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), and Berlin University of Technology, respectively.

4) Computable General Equilibrium and Energy System Analysis

The course introduces students to numerical modeling of energy systems in a general equilibrium context. This topic is particularly important when studying the low-carbon transformation of energy systems at the regional, national, European, and global level. Students are first introduced into the basic of mathematical formulations and data requirements for bottom-up electricity as well as computable general equilibrium models. Afterwards, we study hard-coupling of these models, i.e., integrate the electricity into the CGE model. Finally, the decomposition method is studied reaching a common equilibrium iterating over the models. Participants are expected to have basic knowledge of equilibrium theory or energy modeling.

Trainer: Dr. Jan Abrell, Senior Researcher at the Center for Energy and Environment at ZHAW School of Management and Law, Winterthur and ETH Zurich, and Dr. Mohammad.Khabbazan, University of Hamburg, and Visiting Scholar, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin).

Junior trainer: Luis Alejandro Sarmiento, Berlin School of Economics (BSE) and German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin).

5) Stochastic Electricity Market Modeling with Applications to Peer-to-Peer Trading

The course provides and introduction on stochastic market design advances, for both transmission (wholesale) and distribution (retail) applications, with a focus on peer-to-peer trading (P2P). We will cover both conceptual issues, linking electrical engineering, mathematics, and economics, with real-world applications on market design, pricing, and network regulation in decentral electricity markets. Examples and case studies cover the Brooklyn L03 micro grid, London, a swarm grid in Bangladesh, and others.

Trainer: Prof. Yury Dvorkin, PhD, Assistant Professor at the Tandon School of Engineering at New York University.

Junior trainers: Mario Kendziorski, Richard Weinhold, and Jens Weibezahn, Berlin University of Technology.

Autumn School 2018

The INFRATRAIN 2018 took place from 8 to 12 October, 2018, at DIW Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Advanced Infrastructure Modeling: Numerical Models and Efficiency Analysis.

Training Sessions

1) Modeling Resource Markets: Advanced Methods of Operations Research

This course investigates strategic interactions in energy resource markets and covers advanced optimization and equilibrium concepts to solve the associated models. It aims to provide participants with a strong theoretical understanding of Generalized Nash games, leader‐follower Stackelberg games, and the related mathematical concepts of (Quasi‐) Variational Inequalites (VI and QVI), Mixed Complementarity Problems, and Mathematical/Equilibrium Problems under Equilibrium Constraints (MPEC/EPEC). The practical part of the course covers applications of these methodologies to energy market problems, based on examples from the recent literature, and case studies in the oil, natural gas, and coal sector.

Participants are expected to have a basic knowledge of nonlinear optimization, mixed complementarity problems, Karush‐Kuhn‐Tucker conditions and convexity in higher dimensions as well as hands‐on experience in GAMS.

Trainer: Sauleh Siddiqui, PhD, is Assistant Professor at the Whiting School of Engineering and is on the leadership council of the Systems Institute at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore

 

2) Econometrics for the Analysis of Environmental Policy Interventions, Innovation, and Sustainability

This course provides a broad introduction to microeconometric empirical methods for economists, focusing on applications in environmental economics and related fields. The target audience are advanced masters and early doctoral students. Completing the course will contribute to providing the basis so that students can conduct independent empirical research at the advanced masters/doctoral level. We expect that students have completed a graduate-level introduction to econometrics and statistics. Basic knowledge of microeconomic theory will also be expected. A more specialized background in microeconometrics will be an advantage. The course consists of four intensive days of classes, with eight 90-minute sessions per day. Sessions will consist of theoretical work and applications.

Trainers: Dr. Aleksandar Zaklan (lead instructor), Dr. Astrid Cullmann, Dr. Julian Sagebiel, Dr. Alexander Zerrahn, et al., Senior Researchers at the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), and Berlin University of Technology, respectively.

Autumn School 2017

The INFRATRAIN 2017 took place from 9 to 13 October, 2017, at DIW Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Advanced Infrastructure Modeling: Numerical Models and Efficiency Analysis.

Training Sessions

1) Modeling Resource Markets: Advanced Methods of Operations Research

This course investigates strategic interactions in energy resource markets and covers advanced optimization and equilibrium concepts to solve the associated models. It aims to provide participants with a strong theoretical understanding of Generalized Nash games, leader‐follower Stackelberg games, and the related mathematical concepts of (Quasi‐) Variational Inequalites (VI and QVI), Mixed Complementarity Problems, and Mathematical/Equilibrium Problems under Equilibrium Constraints (MPEC/EPEC). The practical part of the course covers applications of these methodologies to energy market problems, based on examples from the recent literature, and case studies in the oil, natural gas, and coal sector.

Participants are expected to have a basic knowledge of nonlinear optimization, mixed complementarity problems, Karush‐Kuhn‐Tucker conditions and convexity in higher dimensions as well as hands‐on experience in GAMS.

Trainer: Sauleh Siddiqui, PhD, is Assistant Professor at the Whiting School of Engineering and is on the leadership council of the Systems Institute at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore

 

2) Data Analytics and Applications using “R”

The course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of applied data analysis/data sciences. It combines conceptual methods with the ability to implement analysis using the programming language “R”. Among the issues covered are descriptive models and pattern recognition, predictive models using classification, regression, and tree‐based learning, as well as variable selection and model assessment. Guest lectures on applications in the real world, and research on one’s own scientific paper complement the course.

Trainers: Dr. Maria Nieswand is Lecturer in decision support and quantitative methods at the University of Loghborough, School of Business and Economics; Dr. Stefan Seifert, is postDoc in quantitative methods at the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), and Berlin University of Technology.

 

3) Advanced Electricity Sector Modeling: Facing the Challenge of Low-Carbon Transformation

The electricity sector is currently undergoing restructuring, with a higher focus on lower-carbon generation, the integration of high shares of renewables, and increased integration between electricity and other sectors, e.g. mobility and heat. This course provides an overview of numerical modeling of the electricity sector undergoing the low-carbon transformation. The participants will be acquainted with a specific modeling tool: ELMOD, a GAMS-based optimization model, including comprehensive data at the national and European level.

Participants need previous GAMS-programming experience and be familiar with European electricity sector issues.

Trainer: Dr. Friedrich Kunz, is Senior Researcher at the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), with an extensive experience in research and policy consulting on electricity markets, in particularly the modeling of generation, transmission, and demand issues. Previous position at Dresden University of Technology, and as trainer at INFRATRAIN and ENERTAIN events, and extensive lectures and presentations at international conferences.

Autumn School 2016

The INFRATRAIN 2016 took place from 10 to 14 October, 2016, at TU Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Advanced Infrastructure Modeling: Numerical Models and Efficiency Analysis.

Training Sessions

1) Advanced Electricity Sector Modeling: Restructured Electricity Markets and Locational Marginal Pricing

This course will start with a short introduction to electricity markets, institutions, trends, and future perspectives. Based on this, it will cover four specific topics in economic electricity market modeling that are vital for an understanding of  the mechanics of electricity markets, thus enabling participants to generate recommendations and ideas for adjusting the market to new challenges. These topics are: i) Market perspective: offer based dispatch, (ii) Transmission perspective: locational marginal pricing, (iii) Risk perspective of market and transmission operation: hedging & trading, and (iv) Risk perspective on transmission planning. The course will introduce advanced modeling techniques to deal with large-scale multi-stage stochastic programs, and provide application examples.

Participants are expected to have a basic knowledge of linear and mixed-integer optimization problems as well as hands-on experience in GAMS.

Trainer: Dr. Ross Baldick, is Professor in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin and holds the Leland Barclay Fellowship in Engineering. He is a leading expert in the economic modeling of electricity markets. His research focuses on spatial price differentiation,  and the role of uncertainty for short-term dispatch and long-term investment decisions.

http://www.ece.utexas.edu/people/faculty/ross-baldick

 

2) Modelling Resource Markets: Advanced Methods of Operations Research

This course investigates strategic interactions in energy resource markets and covers advanced optimization and equilibrium concepts to solve the associated models. It aims to provide participants with a strong theoretical understanding of Generalized Nash games, leader-follower Stackelberg games, and the related mathematical concepts of (Quasi-) Variational Inequalites (VI and QVI), Mixed Complementarity Problems, and Mathematical/Equilibrium Problems under Equilibrium Constraints (MPEC/EPEC). The practical part of the course covers applications of these methodologies to energy market problems, based on examples from the recent literature, and case studies in the oil, natural gas, and coal sector.

Participants are expected to have a basic  knowledge of nonlinear optimization, mixed complementarity problems, Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions and convexity in higher dimensions as well as hands-on experience in GAMS.

Trainer: Sauleh Siddiqui, PhD, Assistant Professor at the Whiting School of Engineering and is on the leadership council of the Systems Institute at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore.  

http://eng.jhu.edu/wse/systems-institute/page/sauleh-siddiqui

 

3) Efficiency Analysis of Infrastructure Companies

Attention: This course will most likely take place in the week 4-7 October

This course focuses on recent advances in (semi)parametric measurement of productivity and efficiency in production. The methodological discussion includes cross-section and panel data approaches as well as different ways of incorporating determinants of production and inefficiency. The methods are applied to firm level data of public and private infrastructure companies, which are frequently subject to regulatory oversight and benchmarking. Within the empirical analysis of these companies, special attention will be put on the differences in ownership and governance, firms’ capital structure, and their investment behavior.

Participants should have a thorough knowledge of micro-econometrics, nonparametric and parametric efficiency analysis and the software R. Knowledge of STATA is recommended.

Trainer: Subal Kumbhakar, Ph.D., is distinguished Professor of Economics at the University of Binghamton, New York State. His main area of research is applied microeconomics with a focus on efficiency estimation. His works is mainly based on micro data with a special focus on panel data models and their application in various industries, as e.g. banking, electricity generation and distribution, and agriculture. His research has been published in the leading econometric journals, as. Econometrica and the Journal of Econometrics, and various leading field journals, as. the Journal of Productivity Analysis, Energy Economics and the American Journal of Agricultural Economics.

http://www.binghamton.edu/economics/people/tenured-and-tenure-track-faculty/kumbhakar.html

Autumn School 2015

The INFRATRAIN 2015 took place from 5 to 9 October, 2015, at TU Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Advanced Infrastructure Modeling: Numerical Models and Efficiency Analysis.

Training Sessions

1) Advanced Electricity Sector Modeling: Facing the Challenge of Low-Carbon Transformation

The electricity sector is currently undergoing restructuring, with a higher focus on lower-carbon generation, the integration of high shares of renewables, and increased integration between electricity and other sectors, e.g. mobility and heat. This course provides an overview of numerical modeling of the electricity sector undergoing the low-carbon transformation. The participants will be acquainted with a specific modeling tool: ELMOD, a GAMS-based optimization model, including comprehensive data at the national and European level.

Participants need previous GAMS-programming experience and be familiar with European electricity sector issues.

Trainer: Jonas Egerer, Senior Researcher at DIW Berlin, Researcher at TU Berlin and one of the developers of ELMOD; he has many years of experience applying it to different regions and analytical problems, such as congestion management, renewable integration, and cross-border network expansion.

https://www.wip.tu-berlin.de/menue/kontakt_mitarbeiter/jonas_egerer

 

2) Modelling Resource Markets: Advanced Methods of Operations Research

This course investigates strategic interaction in energy resource markets and covers several optimization and equilibrium concepts to solve the associated models. We aim to provide (PhD-) students with a strong theoretical understanding of Generalized Nash games and leader-follower Stackelberg games, and the related mathematical concepts of (Quasi-) Variational Inequalites (VI and QVI), Mixed Complementarity Problems (MCP), Mathematical/Equilibrium Problems under Equilibrium Constraints (MPEC/EPEC). Applications of these methodologies to energy market problems will be covered in the practical part of the course, based on examples from recent literature, and case studies in the oil, natural gas, and coal sectors.

Participants should have knowledge of nonlinear optimization, mixed complementarity problems, Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions and convexity in higher dimensions as well as hands-on experience in GAMS.

 

Trainer: Ph.D. Sauleh Siddiqui, Assistant Professor at the Whiting School of Engineering and is on the leadership council of the Systems Institute at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore.

http://eng.jhu.edu/wse/systems-institute/page/sauleh-siddiqui

 

3) Efficiency Analysis of Infrastructure Companies

IMPORTANT: There will be a pre-event on the 1st of October. Please contact Dr. Maria Nieswand and Stefan Seifert for more information.

This course focuses on recent advances in (semi)parametric measurement of productivity and efficiency in production. The methodological discussion includes cross-section and panel data approaches as well as different ways of incorporating determinants of production and inefficiency. The methods are applied to firm level data of public and private infrastructure companies, which are frequently subject to regulatory oversight and benchmarking. Within the empirical analysis of these companies, special attention will be put on the differences in ownership and governance, firms’ capital structure, and their investment behavior.

Participants should have a thorough knowledge of micro-econometrics, nonparametric and parametric efficiency analysis and the software R. Knowledge of STATA is recommended.

Trainer: Ph.D Subal Kumbhakar, Professor Kumbhakar is distinguished Professor of Economics at the University of Binghamton, New York State. His main area of research is applied microeconomics with a focus on efficiency estimation. His works is mainly based on micro data with a special focus on panel data models and their application in various industries, as e.g. banking, electricity generation and distribution, and agriculture. His research has been published in the leading econometric journals, as e.g. Econometrica and the Journal of Econometrics, but also in various leading field journals, as e.g. Journal of Productivity Analysis, Energy Economics and the American Journal of Agricultural Economics.

http://www.binghamton.edu/economics/people/tenured-and-tenure-track-faculty/kumbhakar.html

Autumn School 2014

This INFRATRAIN 2014 took place from 6 to 10 October, 2014, at TU Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Advanced Infrastructure Modeling: Numerical Models and Efficiency Analysis

Sessions

1) Resilience of Transportation Systems under Stress: Modeling Techniques and Numerical Applications

The resilience of critical infrastructure systems to major disruptions events is one of the fastest growing research and policy areas, and is relevant to both developed countries and the developing world. This course will focus on the quantification of resilience and other related measures, such as robustness and inherent coping capacity, of such systems under multiple hazard types. The main focus will be on goods and passenger transportation systems, while considering bidirectional effects of interdependencies with other critical lifelines and the larger supply chain. Quantitative techniques of operations research for modeling and analyzing networked systems with stochastic attributes will be reviewed and applied. Additionally, mathematical frameworks for optimizing investments in protective, as well as adaptive actions, in these systems will be examined. Among the real-world applications that will be discussed are resilience of the Polish Port of Swinoujscie, U.S. healthcare network and others. Participants should have thorough knowledge of basic methods of Operations Research, such as linear and integer programming, introductory background in stochastic optimization, multi-objective decision making, and bilevel programming, and basic skills in standard economic modelling software (Matlab, GAMS).

Trainer: Ph.D. Elise Miller-Hooks, Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland and Adjunct Professor, Department of Structural Engineering, Ben Gurion University and Appointed Chair of the Transportation Network Modeling Committee of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies of Sciences.http://www.millerhooks.umd.edu.

 

 

2) Advanced Electricity Sector Modeling

This course provides an overview of numerical modeling of the electricity sector. It includes modeling of short-term dispatch, congestion management, and transmission network investment. The participants will be acquainted with a specific modeling tool: ELMOD2.0, a GAMS-based optimization model, including comprehensive data at the national and European level. Participants need previous GAMS-programming experience and be familiar with European electricity sector issues.

Trainer: Dr. Friedrich Kunz, Senior Researcher at DIW Berlin, and one of the developers of ELMOD; he has many years of experience applying it to different regions and analytical problems, such as congestion management, renewable integration, and cross-border network expansion. http://www.diw.de/staff/kunz.

 

3) One and Two-Level Energy Market Equilibrium Modeling (Electricity, Natural gas, Renewables)

This course investigates strategic interaction in energy markets and covers several optimization and equilibrium concepts to solve the associated models. We aim to provide (PhD-) students with a strong theoretical understanding of Generalized Nash games and leader-follower Stackelberg games, and the related mathematical concepts of (Quasi-) Variational Inequalites (VI and QVI), Mixed Complementarity Problems (MCP), Mathematical/Equilibrium Problems under Equilibrium Constraints (MPEC/EPEC). Applications of these methodologies to energy market problems will be covered in the practical part of the course, based on examples from recent literature.

Participants should have a thorough knowledge of nonlinear optimization, mixed complementarity problems, Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions and convexity in higher dimensions as well as hands-on experience in GAMS.

 

Trainers:

Dr. Steven A. Gabriel, Professor of Operations Research, University of Maryland, Research Professor at DIW Berlin, Adjunct Professor at NTNU Trondheim, and co-author of the book “Complementarity Modeling In Energy Markets” (Springer). www.stevenagabriel.umd.edu.

 

Dr. Daniel Huppmann, Researcher at DIW Berlin; his work focuses on modelling strategic behaviour and market power in energy markets combining advanced Operations Reseach methods, game theory and energy economics. Applications include articles on crude oil and natural gas markets, as well as investments in the electricity network. http://www.diw.de/staff/huppmann.

 

4) Efficiency Analysis of Municipal Services & Infrastructure

These companies operate under an increased pressure to reduce costs with intensive competitive and regulatory pressures. Our course provides an overview of theory-based empirical methods to understand the particular decision making behavior of municipal infrastructure companies: Besides reviewing production theory and general principles of efficiency analysis, this course focuses on the theoretical concept of rational inefficiency and its empirical application. Furthermore, state of the art econometric methods and advanced methods of efficiency analysis are introduced and applied to firm level panel data. Application will assess the effects of mergers on efficiency and cost reduction potentials, and investment behavior of the companies under incentive regulation.

Participants should have a thorough knowledge of micro econometrics, nonparametric and parametric efficiency analysis and the software R.

Trainer: Dr. Peter Bogetoft, Professor of Applied Micro Economics at Copenhagen Business School and visiting Professor of Economics at Yale School of Management. His research includes i.a. decision, game and contract theory, performance evaluation and benchmarking. He has been involved in a series of projects with industry and governmental bodies with respect to regulation and benchmarking.http:/www.cbs.dk/en/staff/pbeco.

Autumn School 2013

In 2013, the INFRATRAIN was substituted by the EnerTrain (Energy Infrastructure Training), which took take place from 7 to 11 October, 2013, at DIW Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Advanced Energy Modeling: Numerical Models and Efficiency Analysis.

Sessions

1) Advanced Electricity Sector Modeling

This course provides an overview of numerical modeling of the electricity sector. It includes modeling of short-term dispatch, congestion management, and transmission network investment. The participants will be acquainted with a specific modeling tool: ELMOD2.0, a GAMS-based optimization model, including comprehensive data at the national and European level. Participants need previous GAMS-programming experience and be familiar with European electricity sector issues.

Trainer: Dr. Friedrich Kunz, Senior Researcher at DIW Berlin, and one of the developers of ELMOD; he many years of experience applying it to different regions and analytical problems, such as congestion management, renewable integration, and cross-border network expansion.

 

2) One and Two-Level Energy Market Equilibrium Modeling (Electricity, Natural gas, Renewables)

(attention: training dates September 30th - October 4th)

This course investigates strategic interaction in energy markets and covers several optimization and equilibrium concepts to solve the associated models. We aim to provide (PhD-) students with a strong theoretical understanding of Generalized Nash games and leader-follower Stackelberg games, and the related mathematical concepts of (Quasi-) Variational Inequalites (VI and QVI), Mixed Complementarity Problems (MCP), Mathematical/Equilibrium Problems under Equilibrium Constraints (MPEC/EPEC). Applications of these methodologies to energy market problems will be covered in the practical part of the course, based on examples from recent literature.

Participants should have a thorough knowledge of nonlinear optimization, mixed complementarity problems, Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions and convexity in higher dimensions as well as hands-on experience in GAMS.

Trainer: Dr. Steven A. Gabriel, Professor of Operations Research , University of Maryland, Research Professor at DIW Berlin, Adjunct Professor at NTNU Trondheim, and co-author of the book “Complementarity Modeling In Energy Markets” (Springer), http://www.stevenagabriel.umd.edu.

 

3) Transmission Expansion and Regulation of Electricity Networks: Theory and Numerical Simulations

The course addresses the issue of network investment and regulation. We review the theoretical literature, study a proposed incentive framework for transmission expansion, and analyze how transmission expansion is handled in some restructured markets. Applications will be done in the electricity sectors in Europe and North America, with a particular focus on the current and future role of Financial Transmission Rights (FTRs); numerical modeling will be implemented in GAMS.

Trainer: Dr. Juan Rosellón, Professor of Economics at CIDE (Mexico) and Senior Researcher at DIW Berlin, is widely renowned for his research on electricity transmission, both with theoretical perspective and focus on implementation; he has just co-published a leading book on “Financial Transmission Rights: Analysis, Experiences and Prospects” (2013, Springer).

 

4) Efficiency Analysis of the Energy Sector and Other Utilities

Given the current challenges in international infrastructure regulation, this session focuses on the advanced methods of parametric and nonparametric efficiency analysis for regulatory purposes. The course has a focus on electricity sector benchmarking, but it will also cover other utilities, such as water, waste, and other public services. State-of-the-art econometric and nonparametric models for regulatory benchmarking are derived and applied to utilities and network industries. Beside the introduction into production theory and into the general principles of efficiency analysis this course covers advanced models for data envelopment analysis (DEA), cross-section and panel data models for stochastic frontier analysis (SFA) and the combination of both concepts, the stochastic non-smooth envelopment of data (StoNED). Topics are the estimation of economies of scale and scope, horizontal and vertical integration/separation, decomposition of productivity change.

Trainer: Dr. Astrid Cullmann, Senior Researcher at DIW Berlin, is specialized in nonparametric and parametric efficiency analysis in regulated and non-regulated industries and also works on issues concerning knowledge production and research efficiency.

Autumn School 2012

The INFRATRAIN 2012 took place from October 8 to 12, 2012 on the premises of DIW Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Infrastructure Modeling and Policy: Numerical Models and Efficiency Analysis.

Sessions

1) One and Two-Level Energy Market Equilibrium Modeling

This course investigates strategic interaction in energy markets and covers several optimization and equilibrium concepts to solve the associated models. We aim to provide (PhD-) students with a strong theoretical understanding of Generalized Nash games and leader-follower Stackelberg games, and the related mathematical concepts of (Quasi-) Variational Inequalites (VI and QVI), Mixed Complementarity Problems (MCP), Mathematical/Equilibrium Problems under Equilibrium Constraints (MPEC/EPEC). Applications of these methodologies to energy market problems will be covered in the practical part of the course, based on examples from recent literature.

Participants should have a thorough knowledge of nonlinear optimization, mixed complementarity problems, Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions and convexity in higher dimensions as well as hands-on experience in GAMS.

Trainer: Dr. Steven A. Gabriel, Professor of Operation Research and Project Management, University of Maryland, Research Professor at DIW Berlin, and co-author of the forthcoming book “Complementarity Modeling In Energy Markets” (Springer)

2) Regulatory Benchmarking for Network Industries - Theory and Application to Electricity and Water

Given the current challenges in international infrastructure regulation, this session focuses on the advanced methods of parametric and nonparametric efficiency analysis for regulatory purposes. State-of-the-art econometric and nonparametric models for regulatory benchmarking are derived and applied to network industries like e.g. water and electricity utilities. Beside the introduction into production theory and into the general principles of efficiency analysis this course covers advanced models for data envelopment analysis (DEA), cross-section and panel data models for stochastic frontier analysis (SFA) and the combination of both concepts, the stochastic non-smooth envelopment of data (StoNED). Topics are the estimation of economies of scale and scope, horizontal and vertical integration/separation, decomposition of productivity change.

Trainers:
Dr. Endre Björndal
 (tbc), Associate Professor at NHH Bergen, has considerable experience in the economic modeling of infrastructure industry costs and its application to infrastructure industry issues. Further research and teaching areas are: management science/decision modeling, operations management production planning and control, benchmarking/efficiency analysis, electricity markets, regulation of Electricity Networks.
Dr. Astrid Cullmann, Research Associate at DIW Berlin, is specialized in nonparametric and parametric efficiency analysis in regulated and non-regulated industries and also works on issues concerning knowledge production and research efficiency.

Autumn School 2011

The INFRATRAIN 2011 took place from October 3 to 8, 2011 on the premises of TU Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Infrastructure Modeling and Policy: Electricity and Water.

Sessions

1) One and Two-Level Energy Market Equilibrium Modeling
In this course, we examine both one and two-level models for determining equilibria in energy markets. In the former case, the mixed complementarity problem (MCP) format is used which generalizes optimization and Nash-Cournot games as well as a host of other problems in engineering-economic systems. In the latter case, we explore leader-follower (Stackelberg) games, their generalizations called mathematical programs with equilibrium constraints (MPEC) and equilibrium problems with equilibrium constraints (EPEC) in which there are multiple Stackelberg leaders. Applications in energy, with a focus to electricity, as well as some examples of methodologies are presented.

Trainer: Dr. Steven A. Gabriel, Professor of Operation Research and Project Management, University of Maryland, Research Professor at DIW Berlin, and co-author of the forthcoming book “Complementarity Modeling In Energy Markets” (Springer)

2) Modeling Watershed Economics and Policy
This course explores principles of optimization modeling in GAMS (General Algebraic Modeling System) with application to a range of policy debates that are important to the management of watersheds. This session will explore the use of optimization models that account for several important uses and values of water. We will examine and develop small GAMS models that optimize each of several uses of water, including agriculture, hydroelectric, urban, and environmental, in the face of various
hydrologic, ecological, agronomic, and institutional constraints. After examining models that optimize the economic performance of several single uses, we will examine models that account for multiple uses at the watershed scale. Finally, we plan to address policy options for promoting efficient, equitable, and sustainable water uses.

Trainer: Dr. Frank A. Ward, Professor of Water Economics, New Mexico State University, one of the leading water economists, with ample research and policy experience in modeling water systems and international river basin management

3) Regulatory Benchmarking for Network Industries - Theory and Application to Electricity and Water
Given the current challenges in international infrastructure regulation, this session focuses on the advanced methods of parametric and nonparametric efficiency analysis for regulatory purposes. State-of-the-art econometric and nonparametric models for regulatory benchmarking are derived and applied to network industries like e.g. water and electricity utilities. Beside the introduction into production theory and into the general principles of efficiency analysis this course covers advanced models for data envelopment analysis (DEA) and cross-section and panel data models for stochastic frontier analysis (SFA). Topics are the estimation of economies of scale and scope, horizontal and vertical integration/separation, decomposition of productivity change.

Trainer: Dr. David Saal, Senior Lecturer and Research Convenor, Aston Centre for Critical Infrastructure & Services (ACCIS) at Aston University, and Research Professor at the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin). Dr. Saal has considerable experience in the economic modeling of infrastructure industry costs and its application to infrastructure industry issues; moreover, he also teaches post graduate modules on efficiency and cost modeling which are regularly attended by representatives of both infrastructure firms and their regulators.

Autumn School 2010

The INFRATRAIN 2010 took place from October 4 to 9, 2010 on the premises of TU Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Infrastructure Modeling, Regulation and Innovation.

Sessions

1) Stochastic Optimization Modeling: Principles and Application to Intermittent Renewables in the Energy Market

In this session, we will explore the principles of stochastic optimization and their applications to renewables that have intermittency features. Topics from stochastic optimization will include: recourse methods, chance constraints, and stochastic dynamic programming. We will model the interaction of intermittent renewable sources and fossil fuels to achieve some sort of balance between societal goals and smooth running of the power grid.

Trainer: Prof. Dr. Steven A. Gabriel (University of Maryland)

2) Transmission Expansion of Electricity Networks with Time-Varying Supply and Demand

Based on the existing literature on transmission expansion, this course addresses the challenges of integrating time-varying supply and demand. The focus will be on the adoption of existing mechanisms to renewables integration: incentive schemes, costs-based schemes, and combines schemes such as the Hogan-Rosellon-Vogelsang mechanism. Applications will be implemented in GAMS, e.g. for the Benelux region and the North Sea.

Trainer: Prof. Dr. Juan Rosellon (CIDE, Mexico)

Autumn School 2009

The INFRATRAIN 2009 took place from October 5 to 10, 2009 on the premises of TU Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Infrastructure Modeling, Regulation and Innovation.

Sessions

1) The World Gas Model (WGM): Structure and Scenario Development 

The World Gas Model (WGM) is a dynamic simulation model of the global gas market, covering 80 countries and 95% of world natural gas production and consumption. The course provides an introduction in the model structure and underlying assumptions. Participants will then develop and implement their own scenarios in GAMS. 

Trainers: Ruud Egging (University of Maryland), Daniel Huppmann (DIW Berlin, TU Vienna)

2) Transmission Expansion of Electricity and Natural Gas Networks: Theory and Numerical Simulations

The course addresses the difficult issue of network investment and regulation. We review the theoretical literature and analyze how transmission expansion is handled in restructured markets (such as the California TEAM-approach, or the PJM Market Based Transmission Expansion). Applications will be done in the electricity and the natural gas sector, and implemented in GAMS.

Trainers: Prof. Dr. Juan Rosellon (CIDE, Mexico), Friedrich Kunz (Dresden University of Technology)

3) Innovation Econometrics: Theory and Applications

This course provides an introduction to econometric methods used in the economics of innovation and science & technology. It includes non-parametric efficiency analysis, panel methods, and semiparametric methods. Applications include patenting, non-tangible human capital, agglomeration effects of innovation, etc. Knowledge of STATA and R recommended.

Trainers: Dr. Astrid Cullmann and Jens SchmidtEhmcke (DIW Berlin), Petra Zloczysti (FU Berlin)

Autumn School 2008

The INFRATRAIN 2008 took place from October 6 to 11, 2008 on the premises of TU Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Infrastructure Modeling: Transport, Energy and Institutions.

Sessions

1) Transaction Cost and Institutional Economics: Theory and Applications

This course discusses recent developments in transaction cost economics and institutional economics, and their applications, with a focus on infrastructure sectors and public service provision. A particular focus is on the interdependence between theory and empirical analysis through data collection and econometric techniques. An introduction to the Stata software will be provided.

Trainer: Prof. Dr. Stéphane Saussier, University of Paris 1, Sophia Ruester, TU Dresden

2) Modeling Public Transport Supply in Agglomerations : State of the Art and Hands-on Exercises

Public transport plays an important role for sustainable transport in agglomerations. This course provides an introduction to the state-of-theart methods of modelling public transport supply by using the VISUM software. We will also analyze empirical applications from agglomerations around the world.

Trainer: Martin Winter, Sonja Löwa, TU Berlin

3) Applying Real Option Theory to Electricity Generation Portfolios

The course discusses the theory of real options and its implementation in stochastic dynamic programming using Excel-based Visual Basic. We will simulate the choice of different electricity producers between traditional fossil fuels (with or without CCS), wind, solar, biomass, and other technologies.

Trainer: Prof. Dr. Steve Gabriel, Jeremy Eckhause, University of Maryland

Autumn School 2007

The INFRATRAIN 2007 took place from October 1 to 7, 2007 on the premises of TU Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Infrastructure Modeling and Policy.

Sessions

1) CO2-Mitigation in the Transport Sector - Modeling and Policy

Recent approaches to integrate the transportation sector into CO2-models (partial models, general equilibrium models (CGE)), discussion of policy instruments to reduce transport emissions, implementation into models using GAMS/MPSGE

Trainer: Prof. Dr. Truong P. Truong (University of New South Wales, and Research Professor at DIW Berlin), specialization on modeling of transportation, and partial and equlibrium CO2model

2) Efficiency and Productivity Analysis

Parametric and non-parametric methods of efficiency and productivity analysis, introduction to semi-parametric methods, application to regulated infrastructure sectors and other fields, computer exercises using R, Limdep, and other software

Trainer: Professor Dr. Andreas Stephan (Viadrina-University Frankfurt/Oder, and DIW Berlin), specialization in productivity analysis and the econometrics of infratsructure

3) Stochasticity in Infrastructure Modeling - Theory and Applications

Introduction of stochasticity in optimization and equilibrium models, scenario reduction methods, variational inequality problems, applications to energy, transportion, and telecommunication, modeling in GAMS

Trainer: Professor Dr. Steven Gabriel (University of Maryland), specialization in modeling of engineering-economic infrastructure systems using optimization and equilibrium analysis

Autumn School 2006

The INFRATRAIN 2006 took place from October 2 to 7, 2006 on the premises of TU Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Trends in Infrastructure Modeling and Policy.

Autumn School 2005

The INFRATRAIN 2005 took place from October 4 to 8, 2005 on the premises of TU Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Infrastructure Economics - Theory and Policy.

Autumn School 2004

The INFRATRAIN 2004 took place from October 5 to 9, 2004 on the premises of TU Berlin. It is dedicated to the issue of Network Economics: Modeling and Regulating Transport and Energy Sectors in Europe.