Dynamics of Maritime Systems

Courses of Dynamic of Maritime Systems

Course information and all of our course offerings can be found at Moses and ISIS. For information about the rooms and the course schedule, please refer to ISIS.

Winter semester 2023/2024

Duration of semesters01.10.2023 - 31.03.2024
Lecture period16.10.2023 - 17.02.2024
Lecture-free period23.12.203 - 06.01.2024 as well as public holidays

Aero- and Hydrodynamics of Sailing Yachts

How do you make the best use of the wind to move with the help of sails? And how do you make a speed forecast for sailboats? A guest lecturer provides exciting insights from applications ranging from regattas to cargo shipping. Interesting for everyone with an interest in sailing.

Ship manoeuvering

This course is primarily intended for students with a penchant for equations of motion and direct system identification. If possible, there will be a field trip to the world's second largest shipbuilding test facility in Hamburg as part of the course.

Introduction to ocean engineering and renewable marine energy systems

Here you get an insight into ocean engineering and an overview of fixed, floating and hybrid offshore platforms, for example for the use of sustainable marine energies. What innovative concepts are there and what does such a structure have to withstand? If you want to know more, you will not only learn the basics, but also get an insight into the actual application from a top-class guest lecturer. For students of all disciplines.

Computational fluid dynamics for maritime systems II (CFD II)

This is about some more specific topics of numerical methods for the simulation of viscous flows, such as the treatment of two-phase flows. Suitable for those who already have CFD basics and want to go a little deeper. Part I of the course with the CFD basics will be available again in the summer semester.

Experimental Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering

All common model experiments in shipbuilding are presented theoretically and practically. This course is therefore ideally suited for prospective ship and marine engineers at the beginning of their studies as well as interested external students and career changers.

Ship Hydrodynamics II

If you want to know exactly how the interaction between ship and propeller works and how to determine the required propulsion power during the design process, this is the right course for you. Suitable for prospective shipbuilders at the beginning of their studies and interested career changers from all disciplines. It makes sense, but is not a must, to first listen to Ship Hydrodynamics I (in the next summer semester).

Intact stability of maritime systems

Anyone who wants to know why ships or other floating structures don't simply tip over or sink is in the right place here. Absolutely necessary for prospective shipbuilders at the beginning of their studies and also suitable for interested career changers of all disciplines.

Propeller und Cavitation II

The classic ship's propeller is still the most effective propulsion system for watercraft. Here you can learn how it works and is designed and what other propulsion systems there are. Interesting for all who are enthusiastic about ships. Part I of the course will be offered again next summer semester.

Summer semester

Hydromechanics of marine engineering systems and renewable marine energy systems

How can the energy of the seas be harnessed? What loads act on a structure and how does it move in a swell? If you want to know more about this, you will not only learn the basics, but also get an insight into the actual application from top-class guest lecturers. For students of all disciplines. Fluid mechanics or marine engineering I (always offered in the winter semester) are helpful as a basis.

Ship Hydrodynamics I

After a review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics, the stationary forward motion of a ship is closely examined and it is discussed how the resulting resistance can be determined by model tests. Suitable for prospective shipbuilders at the beginning of their studies and interested career changers from all disciplines.

Leak Stability of Maritime Systems

In this course, you will learn what you need to know to prevent a ship from sinking in the event of an accident. Absolutely necessary for prospective shipbuilders at the beginning of their studies and also suitable for interested career changers of all disciplines. As a basis, Intact Stability of Maritime Systems (available again in the next winter semester) is helpful.

Propeller und Cavitation I

The classic ship's propeller is still the most effective propulsion system for watercraft. Here you can learn how it works and is designed and what other propulsion systems there are. Interesting for all who are enthusiastic about ships. There is no basic knowledge required.

Computational fluid dynamics for maritime systems I (CFD I)

Here you will learn the basics of numerical methods for the simulation of viscous flows. Suitable for all who have heard of fluid mechanics and who want to know how the beautiful colorful pictures of a flow are created and what is behind it. Not only for shipbuilders.

Ship dynamics (sea behavior of ships)

How does a ship move in waves and how can this be predicted by mathematical means? How likely is it that water will wash over the deck and endanger people and goods? For all those who want to know exactly and who already have the mathematical basics.