Applied Biochemistry
Cellink Bioprinter
Regen HU Bioprinter
Imaging of tumor model
Waffle models in petri dish
Bioprinting
Bioprinting
Imaging of tumor model
Waffle models in petri dish

Team Bioprinting

(Group leaders Dr. Johanna Berg, Dr. Beatrice Tolksdorf).

Regular 2D cell culture experiments do not reflect the conditions in 3-dimensional organs. Animal experiments are ethically questionable and due to species-specific differences only of limited value for humans. Therefore, we are engaged in the development of 3D organ models. Modern 3D bio-printing techniques are used to generate and physiologically characterize human models for the lung and liver. Vascular structures are printed into the systems to make the organ models physiologically relevant. In a collaborative project, we are developing a perfusion system for vascularized printed organ models.

We then use the organ models for further studies, for example, infection experiments. For many years, the research group has been involved in the use of RNA interference (RNAi) technology as an antiviral strategy. Thus, we have been able to inhibit numerous human pathogenic viruses, including coxsackievirus B3, parvovirus B19, and human adenovirus, using RNAi in vitro and in vivo. Recently, an siRNA was identified that efficiently inhibits SARS coronavirus in cell culture. The modern antiviral approaches are now being further developed in the printed organ models. Furthermore, we are using the organ models for cancer research.

Grands:

Perfusion system for vascularized, printed organ models

Our 3D printers

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