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Invitation: BIMoS Days, 5th & 12th February 2024 at 4 pm

The Berlin International Graduate School in Model and Simulation based Research cordially invites you and your research group to:

BIMoS Days 2024 at TU-Berlin, main building, room H 3005, followed by a get-together.

Monday, 5th February at 4 pm
Topic: "Multiscale modelling of biological molecules" by Prof. Maria Andrea Mroginski, Modeling of Biomolecular Systems, TU-Berlin

Monday, 12th February at 4 pm
Topic: “Efficient Consensus in Multi-Agent Systems over Wireless Communication Channels & its Use in Traffic Automation Problems" by Prof. Jörg Raisch, Control Systems, TU-Berlin

and

Topic: “Max-plus Algebra for Scheduling and Control of Manufacturing Systems with Time-window Constraints” by Davide Zorzenon, Control Systems, TU Berlin

Abstracts enclosed

Monday, 5th February at 4 pm
Topic: "Multiscale modelling of biological molecules" by Prof. Maria Andrea Mroginski, Modeling of Biomolecular Systems, TU-Berlin

Abstract: The study of biological molecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, is inherently complex due to their dynamic nature and diverse functions. The conventional methods of studying these molecules often fall short in capturing the full spectrum of their dynamic behaviours, which occur across multiple scales. At the atomic and molecular level, the quantum mechanical interactions govern the behaviour of individual atoms and their chemical bonds. However, the emergence of higher-order structures and the functioning of these molecules within cellular and organismal contexts involve a myriad of factors, including environmental conditions, spatial arrangements, and temporal dynamics. Advancements in computational techniques now enable researchers to bridge these scales, providing a comprehensive understanding of molecular dynamics. By integrating quantum mechanics, molecular dynamics, and statistical mechanics, multi-scale modeling offers a nuanced perspective, essential for unravelling the complexities of biological systems. In this talk, I will introduce you to the basic concepts of multiscale modeling of proteins in complex environments.

Monday, 12th February at 4 pm
Topic: “Efficient Consensus in Multi-Agent Systems over Wireless Communication Channels & its Use in Traffic Automation Problems" by Prof. Jörg Raisch, Control Systems, TU-Berlin

Abstract: In this talk, I will discuss how multi-agent systems, in the absence of a dedicated central decision unit, can achieve consensus, i.e., agree on objectives and relevant information on the environment. I will focus on two distinct types of consensus, namely average and max consensus, and explain why they are relevant for multi-agent scenarios. I will briefly summarise standard results, both for the case of constant and time-varying information topologies. I will then outline how emerging mobile communication technology allows to exploit the superposition property of the wireless communication channel to achieve consensus in large groups much more efficiently. This will be illustrated with examples from traffic automation, such as automatic lane changing and distributed automation of traffic intersections for autonomous vehicles. The reported results are based on joint work with F. Molinari, A. Grapentin (FG Regelungssysteme, TU Berlin) and S. Stanczak, N. Agrawal, (FG Netzwerk-Informationstheorie TU Berlin).

and

Topic: “Max-plus Algebra for Scheduling and Control of Manufacturing Systems with Time-window Constraints” by Davide Zorzenon, Control Systems, TU Berlin

Abstract: Time-window constraints show up in several industrial settings. Two examples are the baking and printed circuit boards industries, where both insufficient and excessive durations of some processes (e.g., yeast fermentation in the former case, metal deposition in the latter) can irreparably damage the final product. The presence of temporal upper-bound constraints makes the scheduling task in these systems particularly challenging as, counter-intuitively, machines may be required to work at reduced pace to avoid constraint violations. The aim of this presentation is to discuss the application of new methods, based on the mathematical framework called max-plus algebra, for (openloop) scheduling and (closed-loop) control of manufacturing systems with timewindow constraints. I will first focus on the computation of an important performance index: the makespan. In the max-plus algebra, this quantity admits a closed-form expression, which translates into an algorithm of lower computational complexity compared to standard techniques based on linear programming or graph theory. Finally, I will address the following question: how to control the system such that no temporal constraint violations occur, despite the presence of unforeseeable delays?